Resilience of Small Businesses

What to do when a pandemic has lasted nearly a year and there is little sign of it ending any time soon?  How should struggling businesses act to stay afloat but within the guidelines?  Shockingly perhaps, there are many small firms that are rising to the challenge and showing incredible resilience during this time.

The businesses that are still open are finding new and innovative ways to keep businesses going.  All the while dealing with kids at home and other additional responsibilities.  A lot of eateries are now realizing that takeouts are the best option.  Dining areas have had to remain closed but people still want to enjoy “eating out.”  This way they can do so in a coronavirus-legitimate way and support local businesses.

Many companies have Googled “how much does SEO cost” and are finding ways to make themselves more readily searched online. Since the majority of people are spending far more time online now than ever before, it makes sense that businesses are trying to stay up to date so that people can search for them and find them more easily online.

Educational institutes are figuring out ways to teach online since they are not able to teach on campus right now. The advantage of that is that students are able to access more educational opportunities since distance is no longer an issue.

Fashion and clothing companies have adapted by making masks.  Some make masks to match outfits, others create comic masks and still others make headcoverings and masks to go together.  There is so much that can be done.

U.S. Treasuries Fall As Growth Increases

As U.S. growth increases, treasuries have fallen, according to recent data which revealed growth in both business equipment orders as well as home purchases. Meanwhile, Benchmark notes increased yesterday as concerns regarding the Eurozone heighten and reports revealed that U.S. consumer confidence has fallen.
“The Conference Board consumer confidence report is important, but the reaction was probably excessive,” said Alessandro Mercuri  of Lloyd Bank Corporate Markets in London. “We’ve had a streak of stronger data. If we have a softening of concerns in Europe, we might have a bear steepening in the U.S.”